When My Wife Became My Hero

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When My Wife Became My Hero

When Allie arrived in the United States, we decided instead of working she would get her degree.

Life is what happens while you’re making other plans.

Soon after her arrival, I lost my job. The following year, we depleted our savings and faced eviction.

Then I slipped and fell down a flight of stairs.

Sitting in the emergency room, I looked at my frightened bride; new to this intimidating city, with no knowledge of English.

Our survival depended on her.

Thus began our nightmare. Her relatives (cousins & aunts) suggested she leave me, then, they stopped communicating with her. My friends disappeared.

We lost everything we owned.

On three occasions we went to bed thinking we would be homeless the next day. All three times as I researched homeless shelters my bride shocked me by finding a temporary job and a place for us to live.

One Friday night in October 2013, we had zero money and an empty fridge. I wasn’t scheduled to receive my benefit money until Monday.

Honestly, I thought my bride had lost her mind. As our grumbling stomachs roared she prayed.

Minutes later, she said she needed air. Barely one hundred feet out of the building, we found twenty eight dollars.

That same scenario repeated itself twice in 2014.

In 2015 I had two surgeries (right retina and cervical spine). For a few months I lost use of my arms. Allie bathed, shaved, dressed, fed, and cleaned me in the bathroom.

She became my nurse, wife, counselor, priest, only friend, and hero. Life hurled crap at us; people stealing our food and money, betrayals, and lies, yet she never complained.

Now, we have a two bedroom garden apartment. We are making plans to relocate. My recovery has been steady. With daily exercise, I’m regaining my strength.

I’ll never forget that difficult period and how she rescued me.

For three years, Allie had a hundred reasons to leave me.

And only one reason to stay.

 

Wedding photo of Allie with her nephew Alex taken May 30, 2009.

What actor/actress would play you in the story of your life?

Hola. I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone who supported me last week through a crazy week of posting excerpts of my manuscripts. Your reactions and comments about my work and ideas, inspired me to plow forward on my quest toward publication.

One interesting thing that did occur; so many people suggested actors to play different roles. That is a game I often play with my family.

When I wrote The Executioner’s Diary, I thought of a younger Antonio Banderas as the perfect actor to play the role of a Cuban refugee turned hit man.  I once mailed him and his representatives a copy of my screenplay; but never heard back from them.

The role of Veyda in Paradox was written for Kate Beckinsale. With the few remaining humans accepting their dismal fate; Veyda is the tough soldier who refuses to believe humanity will become extinct. After watching her gritty performance in Underworld, I wanted Kate Beckinsale as my female lead. (It would also provide Lonely Author the opportunity to meet one of his  favorite actresses. Oh, God, she is so hot. Hey a chimp can dream can’t he?)

So, I ask you.

What actor /actress would play YOU in the movie about your life?

 

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Devil Girl Diaries – 2 (The Breakup)

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Every man has that one unforgettable woman that will haunt him until his final day; the girl that got away. Allie detested television, vanilla ice cream, and missionary. She explored the depths of her sexuality; while I discovered the heights of my pain. My muse had a nickname. I called her Devil Girl. I write these words to ease my sorrows. My name is Andrew.

This is our story.

Standing outside the food court

My wobbly knees barely supporting me

Two construction workers approached her

what kind of foolish game was this?

As one reached for her hand

I stormed out of the mall

burning cheeks scorching everything around me

I refuse to share my girl

I refused to play this game

We didn’t speak for days

Ignored her texts, calls, and messages

then I accidentally heard one voicemail

she wept like a baby

I called her, promising to visit her the next day

Allie opened the door and rushed me

Her red eyes full of moist regret

her nakedness embellished the hallway

“I will not share what is mine”

She smiled at my naive words

She replied, “loving is sharing”

from the bedroom came a gorgeous brunette

wearing heels, a smile, and a wicked scent

she impressed me with her outfit

before I could ask, Allie smiled “This is Pandora.

if you love me, let me watch you do her”

what the hell, we are supposed to be arguing

She whispered, “Do you love me Andrew?”

struggling with the stirring in my jeans

I shut my eyes and sighed

Yes I love you Devil Girl

More next Saturday

Do You Enjoy Writing Wicked?

Every hero needs a villain.

Remember the cardboard cutout dastardly villain who squeezed his handle bar mustache between his fingers while tying the damsel in distress to the railroad tracks. Those days are over.

If you are a writer and you have a great hero, there is one thing that you need; an even GREATER villain.

Today’s readers and audiences don’t expect a bad guy who is all brawn and no brains. They want a villain who challenges our hero and defeats him time and time again. This allows you to build tension. Readers want a cunning evil doer who is always two steps ahead of our protagonist.

Think of The Joker (the Heath Ledger version of course) in The Dark Knight, constantly outwitting everyone including Batman. Hannibal Lecter “quid pro quo” demands of Clarice Starling; before he led her to a serial killer (Buffalo Bill) she desperately needed to stop, all the while planning his bold escape from prison. Each bad guy absolutely brilliant yet controlled by their psychopathic desires.

To strengthen your story, give your villain a justified reason to be evil. In my yet to be published sci-fi novel/screenplay, Paradox, Mabus (villain) witnessed the slaughter of his family, now he will over protect his kingdom (his new family). Give the antagonist motivations and goals that conflict with your hero’s needs. Let them clash. The protagonist/antagonist opposing needs will provide conflict throughout your story building to a page turning finale.

This chimp loves writing antagonist and their evil deeds (and an occasional naughty).

Do you enjoy writing wicked?

Please note: My poetic friends, you are not off the hook. Do you enjoy writing wicked?                                                         (I mean wicked in all its evil and naughty connotations.)

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