Do Fiction Writers Live Vicariously Through Their Characters?

Yes, I do.

Remember the last time someone acted a bit snarky with you at the supermarket or on line at the local bank. Have you replayed a moment like that in your mind wishing you had said something clever? Well, one of my secondary characters in my manuscript Paradox, his name is Razor, always has a wry remark ready. Yes, and I grit my teeth and shake my fist every time he says the clever line that’s never discharged from my mouth.

Do I Live vicariously through my characters?

YES, yes, yes. I admit it. With no shame or guilt. My characters accomplish all the things that I never could. They lead exciting lives traveling the world, sipping on the finest champagne, making love to the most beautiful women, and most importantly; overcoming every obstacle. And trust me, I make it hard for them!

Andrew Duran the mysterious fugitive with the secretive past; skilled in combat and in bed. Veyda the unselfish warrior determined to save mankind, ready to sacrifice her own happiness to save the world. These guys are filled with such passion. Theirs lives are extraordinary.

So, I admit my characters bring excitement to my life. And why not? They are the most interesting people I know.

Do you live through vicariously through your characters?

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Does Blogging Help An Unpublished Writer

Hello, as a new member to the blogging world, I ask myself is this platform useful for an unpublished writer. Having read varying opinions about this, I will offer a few random thoughts about the subject.

First, what negatives can come from blogging (other than carpal tunnel syndrome)? Not knowing how to effectively manage one’s time can be a major setback. Blogging your life away when you could be editing your manuscript, writing the next chapter, or improving your query appears to be the greatest danger. Too many people get caught up in social media and forget the priorities in their lives. If your goal is to become a published author, your writing must come before your blog.

Blogging doesn’t necessarily translate into improved book sales for a fiction writer. I have read reports that state blogging is a huge plus for writers of non-fiction, who have a platform to demonstrate their expertise. Their followers will mostly likely be people interested in the subject matter. A fiction writer can post short stories and have a following, but not all of your followers will enjoy the type of fiction you write, thus no guarantee of greater book sales.

What are the positives? Well, I am trying to use my blog as a platform to introduce my characters. I don’t use excerpts from my manuscript, I write about my characters in other periods in their lives; days or years before the time period of the book. My queries will mention my blog and advise literary agents they can learn more about my characters on my blog.

Having this blog has also forced me to think more about my writing and the marketing aspect of the publishing world. We as author need to wear two hats. writer and salesman. And the first thing we need to sell is ourselves. I admit marketing myself and my work has never been my forte. Hopefully, this will help me improve my queries and my self confidence when approaching literary agents. It can’t hurt.

What do you think about blogging helping or hurting your unpublished work?

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Mabus: The Nucleus of Evil

Mabus strolled through the courtyard behind his Ziggurat Palace admiring the green plants and colorful flowers. Their delicious fragrance reminded him so much of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon. He plucked a leafy flower to sniff its multi-colored petals. Relishing its fresh scent, he ignored the wilting stem. He entered a private cemetery. Walking past the small tombstones that marked his failures, he whispered, “Why did the flowers have to die?”

His mind wandered to the distant past, recalling the horrific fate of his wife and five children. A heinous act the aliens made him watch. His enemies offered to spare his young heirs, if he agreed to relinquish his kingdom. Mabus declined and his adversaries showed no mercy. One by one they dismembered his family. Even as his children’s cries tormented his ears and their warm blood splattered his anguished face, he refused to concede.

The atrocious memory remained lodged in his soul like an annoying nail hammered into his skull. The ultimate sacrifice saved the kingdom and the planet Sumer. Now, thousands of years later here on Earth, he refused to permit the human epidemic to contaminate his conquest. He needed to protect his people and the children from the violent humans full of intolerance and hate. The revolting species must be eliminated.

Grounding the little flower in his powerful hand, Mabus walked away, vowing to protect his community as the waning cries of his children echoed in his recollection.

  – Mabus is the antagonist in my novel/screenplay trilogy Paradox

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Introducing Veyda

Her resolute aqua eyes spied the barren subway tunnel. Grateful no one occupied the dark passage, she clenched her trembling fists. Tiny glints of light reflected off of subway rails reminding her of the unseen orbs twinkling in the evening sky. A thousand years have passed since the last man witnessed the unholy heavens. Perhaps, she could succeed where hundreds of others had failed before her.

Veyda possessed no fear of death. With mankind on the brink of annihilation, she refused to wait for the inevitable. Unlike her apprehensive comrades, who rejected the idea of an aggressive campaign against the powerful aliens; she relished the opportunity. Let us decide the time and place of our final destiny.

Extinction. The ungodly thought coursed through her angry five foot eight inch frame like a rabid roller coaster on steroids. Detesting the toxic way it reverberated inside her ears, she expunged the word from her vocabulary. How could fate be so cruel? Did life on Earth really have to end here and now? Not if she had anything to say about it.

Veyda refused to join the dinosaurs and Neanderthals in extinction.

Veyda is the lead female character of my novel/screenplay trilogy Paradox